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Containing Child Controls inside a UserControl

User Controls are a very quick and effective method to develop reusable controls for your application. They are usually much easier to develop than writing your own custom server controls.

I ran into a situation the other day that a user control we’ve made and had been working on for some time, just got a new requirement to be able to contain child server controls. I was a bit surprised to discover this is not a trivial matter.

It seems there is a weird limitation on User controls. If you try to put child controls in them or nest a user control inside another, the designer will complain. Furthermore if you thought you could use the PersistChildrenAttribute in order to convince the designer that your control is really intended to support this behavior, then think again – it seems that the designer simply ignores this possibility when it comes to user controls.

While searching for a solution, I discovered this post by Bobby DeRosa that suggested a reasonable solution. The problem with this solution is that you get XHTML validation errors. However, a comment in the post suggests a better solution.

While a Container User Control is not directly supported, a templated user control is supported by Microsoft.

And so, the below suggested solution will work nicely. Just to make things more interesting I made the sample control support two areas that can contain child controls; a header section and a content section.

The User Control’s code behind looks like this:

public partial class ContainerUserControl : UserControl
{
[PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.InnerProperty)]
publicITemplate Header { get; set; }

[PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.InnerProperty)]
publicITemplate Content { get; set; }

protected override voidOnInit(EventArgs e)
{
base.OnInit(e);
Content.InstantiateIn(ContentPlaceHolder);
Header.InstantiateIn(HeaderPlaceHolder);
}
}

While the markup should have a place holder for each section that will contain child elements:


  

<%@ControlLanguage="C#"AutoEventWireup="true"CodeBehind="ContainerUserControl.ascx.cs"Inherits="TestWebApp.ContainerUserControl"%>
<div>
<
asp:PlaceHolder ID="HeaderPlaceHolder"runat="server">
</
asp:PlaceHolder>

<
asp:PlaceHolder ID="ContentPlaceHolder"runat="server">
</
asp:PlaceHolder>
</
div>

And here is a sample of the usage:

 

<form id="form1" runat="server">
<
div>
<
uc:ContainerUserControl runat="server" ID="OuterContainer">
<
Header>
<
asp:Label ID="Label1" Text="Main label" runat="server" />
</
Header>
<
Content>
<
asp:Button ID="btnTest" runat="server" Text="Test me" />
</
Content>
</
uc:ContainerUserControl>
</
div>
</
form>

You can even nest a user control inside another user control:

<uc:ContainerUserControl runat="server" ID="OuterContainer">
<
Header>
<
asp:Label ID="Label1" Text="Main label" runat="server" />
</
Header>
<
Content>
<
uc:ContainerUserControl ID="InnerContainer" runat="server">
<
Header>
<
asp:Label runat="server" Text="Nested label"/>
</
Header>
<
Content>
<
h2>This is a nested content</h2>
</
Content>
</
uc:ContainerUserControl>
<
asp:Button ID="btnTest" runat="server" Text="Test me" />
</
Content>
</
uc:ContainerUserControl>

One more point to remember is that because the designer does not really support the inner content of the user control, you will not be able to refer directly to controls such as the above button. The reason is that the generated aspx.designer.cs will not include the inner controls as they are a part of the template. Therefore you will need code such as this to refer to the button:

this.OuterContainer.FindControl("btnTest");

Hopefully this will save you some time developing a full blown server control.

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